Fashion experts have predicted a “comfy clothing” revolution that will ban ties, jeans and trainers, and loose-fitting clothing when employees return to the office.

If restrictions are eased on July 19, millions of workers will be back at their desks after taking part in Zoom calls in their loungewear for over a year.

The stark contrast between clothes worn from home to work and those worn in the office has led many to expect a more relaxed dress code.

Experts believe that clothing “allows a little more air to breathe” by adding elastic areas to waistbands and looser-fitting clothes.

It is also said that men could swap a tie for a shirt and a blazer for a pair of jeans, while white fashion sneakers or converses are becoming more common.

But despite these predictions, Nick Wheeler, founder of suits and shirts retailer Charles Tyrwhitt, said sales of ties had been “surprisingly good.”

Many expect a more relaxed dress code (file photo)

Fashion experts predict that starting July 19, men will be able to swap a tie (left picture) for a shirt and a blazer (right) for jeans when they return to the office (file photos)

A woman in a blazer and shirt (file photo) A woman in jeans seen in a work environment (file photo)

The stark contrast between clothes worn from home to work and those worn in the office has led many to expect a more relaxed dress code (file photos)

Tamara Abraham, fashion editor at The Telegraph, told BBC Radio 4’s Today program: “I don’t think we’re going to be going into loungewear anytime soon, but we’ve gotten very used to being comfortable so we probably will Dress codes look a little more relaxed.

“I’ve seen chic, tailored trousers with maybe a little elastic at the back of the waistband so they don’t feel too tight, or dresses that are cut to allow a little air to breathe. I think these will be the things we reach for. ‘

She added, “Men will still wear shirts, but they could drop the tie or there will be a shirt and blazer with jeans.

“Maybe for women a blazer over a T-shirt. And I think coaches will also become more acceptable in many workplaces.

“Smart ones, not the ones you wear to the gym, but a white fashion trainer or a Converse won’t be an odd sight at a business meeting.”

However, Charles Tyrwhitt’s Mr. Wheeler believes the suit and tie are “coming back very much”.

He told the radio show, “I wouldn’t say it is [lockdown] Suit and tie killed.

“I think during the lockdown, to my utter annoyance, people weren’t wearing suits or ties, but they’re very happy to come back.”

Tamara Abraham, fashion editor at The Telegraph, said white fashion shoes or converses could become commonplace (file photo) A man wearing blue converses (file photo)

Tamara Abraham, fashion editor at The Telegraph, said white fashion shoes or converses could become commonplace (file photos)

Experts believe that clothes They predicted that the waistbands and looser-fitting dresses would have elastic sections

Experts believe that clothing “allows a little more air to breathe” by adding elastic sections to waistbands and looser-fitting clothing (file photos).

He added, “I was sitting next to someone at a wedding the other day who was trying to find a tie in Marlow and said the only place they could find one was in our store.

“I think if people stop selling ties, the people who are selling them are likely to sell a few more, and we actually see that when we get out of lockdown.

“Our tie sales were surprisingly good – not like they used to be, but still surprisingly good.”

Regarding the possibility of shop closings due to restrictions, he said, “Men like the idea of ​​getting up in the morning and putting on a suit and tie – it’s all very simple. Now you have to make some decisions.

“And what we have found in our business is that around 20 percent of our sales are generated through personal appointments. It’s like stepping back in the 19th century where you walk into a store and have the right attention and you would probably work for the person in the store to make you look your best.

Despite these predictions, Nick Wheeler, founder of suits and shirts retailer Charles Tyrwhitt (store pictured above) said sales of ties had been

Despite these predictions, Nick Wheeler, founder of suits and shirts retailer Charles Tyrwhitt (store pictured above) said sales of ties had been “surprisingly good”.

“People always say, ‘Are we going to close our stores’ – it’s impossible to say at this point because we’re still getting out of lockdown and until we see what the new norm will look like, we’ll have to wait and see. ‘

The order to work from home is expected to be lifted in England on July 19, and Chancellor Rishi Sunak said he looked forward to returning to the offices.

Boris Johnson confirmed on Monday night that the legal requirement introduced in March last year, which has left millions in the guest room or at the kitchen table, will be abolished.

But the step to be taken when step four of the roadmap out of lockdown goes into effect – most likely July 19 – will allow employers to choose the pace at which their employers return to work.

There will also be new guidelines for operating a safe workplace based on pre-pandemic health and safety executive (HSE) rules.

There will be a boost for urban retailers that have suffered from low footfall and businesses with large, expensive premises that have been vacant for months at high costs.

However, it remains to be seen how many companies – and employees – want to return to full-time working life and the financial and time costs involved.