Man tries to sue his wife after tripping over her shoes | Photo credit: iStock Images

Key highlights

  • John Walworth paid over $ 80,000 in medical bills after tripping over his wife’s shoes and breaking several bones
  • He did not see her shoes as he carried a box of vinegar into the basement of her house
  • His lawyer argued that Khoury created dangerous conditions in her home and failed to fulfill her duty as a hostess to protect a “social guest” from those conditions

Cleaveland, Ohio: A man who fell down the stairs and suffered multiple fractures after tripping over a pair of shoes from his then-fiancé cannot sue her, an Ohio court ruled.

John Walworth suffered multiple fractures and paid over $ 80,000 in medical bills after falling down the basement stairs at his current wife Judy Khoury’s home in February 2018. He didn’t see her shoes as he carried a box of vinegar into the basement of her house in Cleaveland’s West Park neighborhood.

Walworth carried a box of four one-gallon jugs of vinegar from her car through a back door into her basement. He performed on a pair of black and gray shows that Khoury had left on the way. He fell down the stairs after losing his balance and broke bones in his leg, arm and hand.

According to court records, he had to undergo three operations and went into physiotherapy for several months after the accident.

Walworth filed a lawsuit against Khoury in October 2019. His lawyer argued that Khoury created dangerous conditions in her home and failed to perform her hostess duty to protect a “social guest” from those conditions.

Aside from $ 80,000 in medical bills, Walworth also lost more than $ 18,000 in income from being unable to work for several months.

Khoury said she regularly leaves her shoes on the back door. She wasn’t sure if he had tripped over her shoes, however. She said that she believed it was her fault that he fell.

Khoury’s attorneys argued that her feeling of responsibility for leaving the shoes off did not amount to her assuming legal responsibility for Walworth’s injuries.

“If Mr. Walworth had taken normal care and just looked where he was going, especially when going down a flight of stairs, he would have easily seen the shoes on the floor,” said Khoury’s lawyers.

The couple married in May 2019, more than a year after the accident.

A three-person panel decided that Khoury’s shoes were “open and obvious” and that a person who had taken reasonable precautions could have recognized them.